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Media Gallery Results - 1 - 20 of 94 returned

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Open Image KSC-2014-4555
KSC-2014-4555 (11/20/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Workers are on hand to receive NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, wrapped in plastic and secured onto a portable work stand, into the high bay of Building 1 at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. DSCOVR will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of NOAA's space weather alerts and forecasts. Read more...

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Open Image KSC-2014-4554
KSC-2014-4554 (11/20/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NOAA’s newly arrived Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, wrapped in plastic and secured onto a portable work stand, is delivered to the high bay of Building 1 at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. DSCOVR will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of NOAA's space weather alerts and forecasts. Read more...

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Open Image KSC-2014-4553
KSC-2014-4553 (11/20/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Workers monitor NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, wrapped in plastic and secured onto a portable work stand, as it travels between the airlock of Building 2 to the high bay of Building 1 at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. DSCOVR will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of NOAA's space weather alerts and forecasts. Read more...

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Open Image KSC-2014-4552
KSC-2014-4552 (11/20/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Workers transfer NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, wrapped in plastic and secured onto a portable work stand, from the airlock of Building 2 to the high bay of Building 1 at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. DSCOVR will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of NOAA's space weather alerts and forecasts. Read more...

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Open Image KSC-2014-4551
KSC-2014-4551 (11/20/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, wrapped in plastic and secured onto a portable work stand, makes a short trek from the airlock of Building 2 to the high bay of Building 1 at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. DSCOVR will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of NOAA's space weather alerts and forecasts. Read more...

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Open Image KSC-2014-4550
KSC-2014-4550 (11/20/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A forklift is enlisted to move NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, wrapped in plastic and secured onto a portable work stand, from the airlock of Building 2 to the high bay of Building 1 at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. DSCOVR will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of NOAA's space weather alerts and forecasts. Read more...

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Open Image KSC-2014-4549
KSC-2014-4549 (11/20/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Workers align NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, wrapped in plastic, onto a portable work stand at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. DSCOVR will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of NOAA's space weather alerts and forecasts. Launch is currently scheduled for January 2015 aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 v 1.1 launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. To learn more about DSCOVR, visit http://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/DSCOVR. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

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Open Image KSC-2014-4548
KSC-2014-4548 (11/20/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, wrapped in plastic, is transferred from its transportation pallet to a portable work stand at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. DSCOVR will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of NOAA's space weather alerts and forecasts. Read more...

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Open Image KSC-2014-4547
KSC-2014-4547 (11/20/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A lifting device is attached to NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, wrapped in plastic, to remove it from its transportation pallet at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. DSCOVR will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of NOAA's space weather alerts and forecasts. Read more...

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Open Image KSC-2014-4546
KSC-2014-4546 (11/20/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Preparations are underway to lift NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, wrapped in plastic, from its transportation pallet at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. DSCOVR will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of NOAA's space weather alerts and forecasts. Read more...

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Open Image KSC-2014-4545
KSC-2014-4545 (11/20/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, wrapped in plastic, comes into view as the protective shipping container is lifted from around the spacecraft at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. DSCOVR will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of NOAA's space weather alerts and forecasts. Read more...

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Open Image KSC-2014-4544
KSC-2014-4544 (11/20/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Preparations are underway to remove a protective shipping container from around NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. DSCOVR will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of NOAA's space weather alerts and forecasts. Launch is currently scheduled for January 2015 aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 v 1.1 launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. To learn more about DSCOVR, visit http://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/DSCOVR. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

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Open Image KSC-2014-4543
KSC-2014-4543 (11/20/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The truck delivering NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, enclosed in a protective shipping container, backs up to the door of the airlock of Building 2 at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. DSCOVR will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of NOAA's space weather alerts and forecasts. Read more...

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Open Image KSC-2014-4542
KSC-2014-4542 (11/20/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, enclosed in a protective shipping container, is delivered by truck to the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida, near Kennedy Space Center. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force. DSCOVR will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of NOAA's space weather alerts and forecasts. Launch is currently scheduled for January 2015 aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 v 1.1 launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. To learn more about DSCOVR, visit http://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/DSCOVR. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

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Stream Video KSC-05-S-00145
KSC-05-S-00145 (05/24/2005) --- NOAA-N: Launch Status Briefing - Tiffany Nail: NOAA-N will launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California at about 3:30 a.m. Pacific time on May 11th. But dozens of engineers and staff at Kennedy Space Center in Florida have played a huge part in preparing NOAA-N for launch. Next, we'd like you to meet Omar Baez, NASA's launch manager for this mission. Thanks for joining our webcast today, Omar. Omar Baez: Thank you, Tiffany. It is a pleasure being here, getting ready for this NOAA-N launch tomorrow. Read more...

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Stream Video KSC-05-S-00143
KSC-05-S-00143 (05/23/2005) --- Tiffany Nail: Also with us today is Captain Paul Lucyk, the weather officer for the NOAA-N launch. Thanks for joining us, Captain. Paul Lucyk: Thank you, Tiffany. It's great to be here. Nail: Can you please tell us how the weather is looking for launch day? Explain how it affects NASA's decision to launch. Lucyk: Sure, I'd be glad to. On the night of launch, my weather team and I will monitor multiple constraints throughout the count. Several of these constraints are established to protect the vehicle against natural and triggered lightening and also monitor constraints for precipitation which could damage the vehicle during the assent and fly-out, as well as surface winds that are essential for the safety of tower rolls, fueling and lift off. Read more...

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Stream Video KSC-05-S-00142
KSC-05-S-00142 (05/23/2005) --- NOAA-N Webcast Closing Tiffany Nail: Thanks to all of you for sending us such great questions. Two lucky winners are about to find out that they'll be getting NOAA-N mission gift packs. Gift packs include a NOAA-N mission poster, patch, fact sheet and a lapel pin. Winners are for today's Webcast, are John from Capac and Harriet from Baton Rouge. One of our next NASA Direct Webcast will highlight NASA's exciting Return to Flight Space Shuttle mission STS-114. Here's what's coming. Return To Flight Video plays. Nail: Don't forget to join our Virtual Launch Control Center on Wednesday at 1 a.m. Pacific time to see live coverage of the NOAA-N launch. Thanks so much for joining us. I'm Tiffany Nail.

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Stream Video KSC-05-S-00140
KSC-05-S-00140 (05/23/2005) --- NOAA-N: Webcast Introduction Tiffany Nail: Hello, everyone, and thanks for joining NASA Direct's exciting prelaunch coverage of NOAA-N, the latest polar-orbiting satellite to monitor the Earth's atmosphere. Today we'll have an opportunity to hear from some of the key people who will be instrumental in designing and developing the NOAA spacecraft and mission. They'll explain how the Polar Operational Environmental Satellite Program, commonly known as a POES series of satellites, help scientists provide more accurate worldwide weather forecasting in search and rescue operations. Read more...

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Stream Video KSC-05-S-00139
KSC-05-S-00139 (05/23/2005) --- Tiffany Nail: Now that we've learned a bit about the mission and heard from members of our launch team, we're pleased to introduce our final two guests. Steve Pszcolka is the NOAA-N observatory manager for NASA, and Bill Mazur is NOAA's polar satellite acquisition manager. Steve and Bill, welcome to our webcast. Mazur and Pszcolka give an overview of their area of expertise and answer questions submitted by the public. Nail: Thank you both so much for being a part of NASA Direct broadcast Pszcolka: Thank you. Mazur: Enjoyed it. Nail: We really appreciate your answers and what you helped us learn about the POES program and the NOAA-N mission.

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Stream Video KSC-05-S-00149
KSC-05-S-00149 (05/20/2005) --- Commentator George Diller interviews Karen Halterman, Project Manager of the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, MD.

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