skip to main content Access Keys List

Access Keys Definition

Remember to use the 'Alt' key in combination with the access key in Windows and the 'Ctrl' key in combination with the access key in Mac

Windows requires that the 'Enter' key be pressed after the access key is activated.

Select a bookmarking site.

Or copy the link below

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/
kennedy/home/index.html

Media Gallery Results - 1 - 20 of 5556 returned

Category: KSC Events To refine search, enter text here

Open Image KSC-2014-4648
KSC-2014-4648 (12/02/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – From left, Mike Bolger, Ground Systems Development and Operations program manager and Mark Geyer, Orion program manager, participate in a live online Ask Me Anything, or AMA, session for reddit.com followers during Orion preflight activities at NASA Kennedy Space Center's News Center in Florida. Not shown, but also participating is Todd May, Space Launch System program manager. Discussion topics include Mars and technology. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4647
KSC-2014-4647 (12/02/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA managers participate in a live online Ask Me Anything, or AMA, session for reddit.com followers during Orion preflight activities at NASA Kennedy Space Center's News Center in Florida. At left, is Mike Bolger, Ground Systems Development and Operations program manager. Not shown, but also participating were Mark Geyer, Orion program manager, and Todd May, Space Launch System program manager. Discussion topics include Mars and technology. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4646
KSC-2014-4646 (12/02/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA managers participate in a live online Ask Me Anything, or AMA, session for reddit.com followers during Orion preflight activities at NASA Kennedy Space Center's News Center in Florida. Participating are Mike Bolger, Ground Systems Development and Operations program manager Mark Geyer, Orion program manager and Todd May, Space Launch System program manager. Discussion topics include Mars and technology. Monitoring the live discussion is Brandi Dean, public affairs specialist from Johnson Space Center in Houston. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4645
KSC-2014-4645 (12/02/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA managers participate in a live online Ask Me Anything, or AMA, session for reddit.com followers during Orion preflight activities at NASA Kennedy Space Center's News Center in Florida. From left, are Mike Bolger, Ground Systems Development and Operations program manager and Mark Geyer, Orion program manager. Also participating, but not shown in the photo is Todd May, Space Launch System program manager. Discussion topics include Mars and technology. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4644
KSC-2014-4644 (12/02/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA managers participate in a live online Ask Me Anything, or AMA, session for reddit.com followers during Orion preflight activities at NASA Kennedy Space Center's News Center in Florida. From left, are Mike Bolger, Ground Systems Development and Operations program manager and Mark Geyer, Orion program manager. Across from them, in the plaid shirt is Todd May, Space Launch System program manager. Discussion topics include Mars and technology. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4416
KSC-2014-4416 (11/11/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – As rain showers dissipate, a rainbow appeared over the Kennedy Space Center's Press Site and turn basin. In the foreground is the historic countdown clock. In the background, is Launch Pad 39B where agency's Space Launch System will launch astronauts aboard the Orion spacecraft to deep-space destinations such as an asteroid and Mars. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4415
KSC-2014-4415 (11/11/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – As rain showers dissipate, a rainbow appeared over NASA's Kennedy Space Center's Launch Pad 39B. This is the site where the agency's Space Launch System will launch astronauts aboard the Orion spacecraft to deep-space destinations such as an asteroid and Mars. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4414
KSC-2014-4414 (11/11/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – As rain showers dissipate, a rainbow appeared over NASA's Kennedy Space Center's Launch Pad 39B. This is the site where the agency's Space Launch System will launch astronauts aboard the Orion spacecraft to deep-space destinations such as an asteroid and Mars. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4413
KSC-2014-4413 (11/11/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – As rain showers dissipate, a rainbow appeared over the Kennedy Space Center's Press Site and turn basin. In the background is the historic countdown clock. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4378
KSC-2014-4378 (11/03/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Rob Mueller, left, NASA senior technologist in the Surface Systems Office in Kennedy Space Center's Engineering and Technology Directorate, talks with former NASA Apollo astronaut Buzz Aldrin during a demonstration of the Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot, or RASSOR, at the automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The event was held to announce Moon Express Inc. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4377
KSC-2014-4377 (11/03/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Rob Mueller, left, NASA senior technologist in the Surface Systems Office in Kennedy Space Center's Engineering and Technology Directorate, talks with former NASA Apollo astronaut Buzz Aldrin during a demonstration of the Regolith Advanced Surface System Operations Robot, or RASSOR, at the automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The event was held to announce Moon Express Inc. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4376
KSC-2014-4376 (11/03/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Members of the media watch a demonstration of the Regolith Advanced Surface System Operations Robot, or RASSOR, during a media event at the automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Tom Engler, center, in the suit, deputy director of Kennedy's Center Planning and Development, announced Moon Express Inc., of Moffett Field, California is selected to utilize Kennedy facilities for NASA's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4375
KSC-2014-4375 (11/03/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Rob Mueller, NASA senior technologist in the Surface Systems Office in Kennedy Space Center's Engineering and Technology Directorate, demonstrates the Regolith Advanced Surface System Operations Robot, or RASSOR, during a media event at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. The event was held to announce Moon Express Inc., of Moffett Field, California is selected to utilize Kennedy facilities for NASA's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4374
KSC-2014-4374 (11/03/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Bob Richards, standing at left in front of the cameras, co-founder and chief executive officer of Moon Express Inc., of Moffett Field, California, speaks to the media during an event to announce the company's selection to utilize Kennedy Space Center facilities as part of NASA's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative. Third from left in the group is former NASA Apollo astronaut Buzz Aldrin. The event took place at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4373
KSC-2014-4373 (11/03/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Bob Richards, co-founder and chief executive officer of Moon Express Inc., of Moffett Field, California, speaks to the media during an event to announce the company's selection to use Kennedy Space Center's facilities as part of NASA's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative. The event took place at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4372
KSC-2014-4372 (11/03/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Greg C. Shavers, Lander Technology director at Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama, speaks to members of the media during an event to announce the agency's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative and introduced one of the partners, Moon Express Inc. of Moffett Field, California. The event took place at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4371
KSC-2014-4371 (11/03/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Tom Engler, deputy director of Center Planning and Development at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, speaks to members of the media during an event to announce the agency's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative and introduced one of the partners, Moon Express Inc. of Moffett Field, California. The event took place at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4370
KSC-2014-4370 (11/03/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Project Manager Sonja Hernandez, Kennedy TV senior systems engineer Ronald Gonser and Kennedy/IMCS senior manager Jeff Van Pelt dig in behind the current countdown clock during the groundbreaking ceremony for the new countdown clock. The old timepiece was designed by Kennedy engineers and built by Kennedy technicians in 1969. Not including the triangular concrete and aluminum base, the famous landmark is nearly 6 feet 70 inches high, 26 feet 315 inches wide and 3 feet deep. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4369
KSC-2014-4369 (11/03/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Public Affairs Officer George Diller shovels the first scoop of soil behind the current countdown clock during the groundbreaking ceremony for the new countdown clock. The old timepiece was designed by Kennedy engineers and built by Kennedy technicians in 1969. Not including the triangular concrete and aluminum base, the famous landmark is nearly 6 feet 70 inches high, 26 feet 315 inches wide and 3 feet deep. The new display will be similar in size, with the screen being nearly 26 feet wide by 7 feet high. For more information on the countdown clock, go to http://go.nasa.gov/10Zku10. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2014-4368
KSC-2014-4368 (11/03/2014) --- CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Public Affairs Officer George Diller digs in behind the current countdown clock during the groundbreaking ceremony for the new countdown clock. The old timepiece was designed by Kennedy engineers and built by Kennedy technicians in 1969. Not including the triangular concrete and aluminum base, the famous landmark is nearly 6 feet 70 inches high, 26 feet 315 inches wide and 3 feet deep. The new display will be similar in size, with the screen being nearly 26 feet wide by 7 feet high. For more information on the countdown clock, go to http://go.nasa.gov/10Zku10. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

S | M | L | Details