skip to main content Access Keys List

Access Keys Definition

Remember to use the 'Alt' key in combination with the access key in Windows and the 'Ctrl' key in combination with the access key in Mac

Windows requires that the 'Enter' key be pressed after the access key is activated.

Select a bookmarking site.

Or copy the link below

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/
kennedy/home/index.html

Media Gallery Results - 1 - 20 of 45 returned

Category: Posters To refine search, enter text here

Open Image KSC-2012-1868
KSC-2012-1868 (02/17/2012) --- Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex: Facilities on Merritt Island were sufficiently advanced by November 1964 to permit Sunday drive-through tours. The center set up a modest collection of model rockets and pictures in a warehouse for visitors to view. Based on a study by the U.S. National Park Service for a permanent facility, NASA selected the site on its own property and contracted with a commercial firm to operate the new center and bus tours. The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex has been expanded many times in the years since to better serve the increasing number of guests, provide new displays and tell the NASA story to the public. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1867
KSC-2012-1867 (02/17/2012) --- Spacecraft: The Kennedy Space Center has processed and launched many scientific missions to study Earth, the moon, other planets, and the space environment, which has greatly expanded our knowledge and understanding of the solar system. These automated machines have orbited and landed on Venus and Mars, explored the Sun’s environment, observed comets and asteroids, and made close-range surveys while flying past Mercury, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. The Launch Services Program, established in 1998, continues this mission today. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1866
KSC-2012-1866 (02/17/2012) --- Apollo-Soyuz Test Project: The first international crewed spaceflight was a joint U.S.-U.S.S.R. rendezvous and docking mission. The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, or ASTP, took its name from the spacecraft employed: the American Apollo and the Soviet Soyuz. The three-man Apollo crew lifted off from Kennedy Space Center aboard a Saturn IB rocket on July 15, 1975, to link up with the Soyuz that had launched a few hours earlier. A cylindrical docking module served as an airlock between the two spacecraft for transfer of the crew members. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1865
KSC-2012-1865 (02/17/2012) --- Orion / Space Launch System: NASA has selected the design of a new Space Launch System SLS that will take the agency's astronauts farther into space than ever before and provide the cornerstone for America's future human space exploration efforts. The SLS will launch human crews beyond low Earth orbit in the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle. Orion is America’s next generation spacecraft. It will serve as the exploration vehicle that will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel, carry the crew to distant planetary bodies, and provide safe return from deep space. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1864
KSC-2012-1864 (02/17/2012) --- Skylab and Mir Space Stations: In 1964, design and feasibility studies were initiated for missions that could use modified Apollo hardware for a number of possible lunar and Earth-orbital scientific and applications missions. An S-IVB stage of a Saturn V launch vehicle was outfitted completely as a workshop. The Skylab 1 Orbital Workshop with its Apollo Telescope Mount was launched into orbit May 14, 1973. The Skylab 2, 3 and 4 missions, each with three-man crews, proved that humans could live and work in space for extended periods. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1863
KSC-2012-1863 (02/17/2012) --- Space Shuttle Payloads: Kennedy Space Center was the hub for the final preparation and launch of the space shuttle and its payloads. The shuttle carried a wide variety of payloads into Earth orbit. Not all payloads were installed in the shuttle's cargo bay. In-cabin payloads were carried in the shuttle's middeck. Cargo bay payloads were typically large payloads which did not require a pressurized environment, such as interplanetary space probes, earth-orbiting satellites, scientific laboratories and International Space Station trusses and components. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1862
KSC-2012-1862 (02/17/2012) --- Satellites: The principal objectives of the Launch Services Program are to provide safe, reliable, cost-effective and on schedule launch services for NASA and NASA-sponsored payloads seeking launch on expendable vehicles. These payloads have a number of purposes. Scientific satellites obtain information about the space environment and transmit it to stations on Earth. Applications satellites designed to perform experiments that have everyday usefulness for people on Earth, such as weather forecasting and communications. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1861
KSC-2012-1861 (02/17/2012) --- Presidential Visits to Kennedy Space Center: All the U. S. presidents shown here were in office at the time they visited KSC. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, 02/10/1960 President Lyndon B. Johnson visited twice, 09/14/1964 and 09/27/1966 President Richard M. Nixon viewed the Apollo 12 launch on 11/14/1969 President Jimmy Carter came to KSC on 10/01/1978 President William J. Clinton viewed the STS-95 launch on 10/29/1998 and President Barack H. Obama visited KSC twice, 04/15/2010 and 04/29/2011. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1860
KSC-2012-1860 (02/17/2012) --- Launch Complex 39 Construction: Launch Complex 39 LC-39 was originally designed and built to launch American astronauts toward the moon. The complex stretches inland from the Atlantic Ocean across four miles of what, until 1963, was a land of intermittent marshes and sandy scrub growth. In less than four years, starting with 1963 and ending with 1966, it was transformed into an operational spaceport embodying a mobile concept: rockets and spacecraft are erected in one area and transported to a separate location for launch. A total of 153 vehicles have been launched from LC-39. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1859
KSC-2012-1859 (02/17/2012) --- Space Shuttle Orbiters: From its establishment in 1958, NASA studied aspects of reusable launch vehicles and spacecraft that could return to earth. On January 5, 1972, President Richard Nixon announced that the United States would develop the space shuttle, a delta-winged orbiter about the size of a DC-9 aircraft. Between the first launch on April 12, 1981, and the final landing on July 21, 2011, NASA's space shuttle fleet -- Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour – launched on 135 missions, helped construct the International Space Station and inspired generations. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1858
KSC-2012-1858 (02/17/2012) --- Project Mercury: With Project Mercury, the United States gained its first experience in conducting human space missions that provided scientific and engineering knowledge of astronauts in space. Alan Shepard made history May 5, 1961, as America's first man in space. Less than a year later, John Glenn made the nation’s first orbital flight on Feb. 20, 1962. After two suborbital and three orbital missions, Project Mercury ended with a 22-orbit spaceflight on May 16, 1963. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1857
KSC-2012-1857 (02/17/2012) --- Project Mercury: With Project Mercury, the United States gained its first experience in conducting human space missions that provided scientific and engineering knowledge of astronauts in space. Alan Shepard made history May 5, 1961, as America's first man in space. Less than a year later, John Glenn made the nation’s first orbital flight on Feb. 20, 1962. After two suborbital and three orbital missions, Project Mercury ended with a 22-orbit spaceflight on May 16, 1963. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1856
KSC-2012-1856 (02/17/2012) --- Launch Vehicles: Launch vehicles are the rocket-powered systems that provide transportation from the Earth’s surface into the environment of space. Kennedy Space Center’s heritage includes launching robotic and satellite missions into space primarily using Atlas, Delta and Titan launch vehicles. Other launch vehicles include the Pegasus and Athena. The Launch Services Program continues this mission today directing launches from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Kodiak, Alaska and Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1855
KSC-2012-1855 (02/17/2012) --- President John F. Kennedy: President John F. Kennedy visited Cape Canaveral on three separate occasions, twice in 1962 and November 16, 1963. He presided over a Project Mercury ceremony to award John Glenn the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, toured the Launch Operations Center complexes and rode in a helicopter over the Merritt Island Launch Area, which was under construction to support the Apollo Program. On November 29, 1963, President Lyndon B. Johnson renamed the Launch Operations Center the John F. Kennedy Space Center. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1854
KSC-2012-1854 (02/17/2012) --- International Space Station: The International Space Station, or ISS, was built by sixteen nations, including the United States, Canada, Russia, Japan, Brazil, and 11 European nations. Each participating country contributed its expertise. This project was based on cooperative agreements on the design, development, operation, and utilization of the space station. The ISS marked its 10th anniversary of continuous human occupation on Nov. 2, 2010. Since Expedition 1, which launched Oct. 31, 2000, and docked Nov. 2, the space station has been visited by 202 individuals. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1853
KSC-2012-1853 (02/17/2012) --- International Cooperation: NASA international cooperation provides opportunities for utilization of space by NASA partners worldwide. Cooperative programs allow each participating country to contribute its special talents and facilities to a common goal. International cooperation is a cornerstone of NASA’s space program today with multi-national crews living and working aboard the International Space Station. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1852
KSC-2012-1852 (02/17/2012) --- Industrial Area Construction: Located 5 miles south of Launch Complex 39, construction of the main buildings -- Operations and Checkout Building, Headquarters Building, and Central Instrumentation Facility – began in 1963. In 1992, the Space Station Processing Facility was designed and constructed for the pre-launch processing of International Space Station hardware that was flown on the space shuttle. Along with other facilities, the industrial area provides spacecraft assembly and checkout, crew training, computer and instrumentation equipment, hardware preflight testing and preparations, as well as administrative offices. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1851
KSC-2012-1851 (02/17/2012) --- Project Gemini: On Jan. 3, 1962, NASA announced the advanced Mercury Mark II project had been named "Gemini." After 12 missions – 2 uncrewed and 10 crewed – Project Gemini ended Nov. 15, 1966, following a nearly four-day, 59 orbit-flight. Its achievements included long-duration spaceflight, rendezvous and docking of two spacecraft in Earth orbit, extravehicular activity, and precision-controlled re-entry and landing of the spacecraft. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1850
KSC-2012-1850 (02/17/2012) --- Dr. Kurt H. Debus, Kennedy Space Center's First Director: A doctor of philosophy in engineering from Darmstadt University, Debus was selected by Dr. Wernher von Braun to direct the Experimental Missile Firing Branch which began launching missiles from Cape Canaveral in 1953. Dr. Debus became the first Center Director for the new independent Launch Operations Center, and it was his job to put Saturn/Apollo into space. His tenure at Kennedy Space Center spanned 13 years, from 1962 to 1974. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-2012-1849
KSC-2012-1849 (02/17/2012) --- Center Directors: The Kennedy Space Center has had ten Center Directors. The first Center Director, Dr. Kurt H. Debus, was followed by: Row 1, left to right – Lee R. Scherer, Richard G. Smith, and Lieutenant General Forrest S. McCartney, USAF, ret.. Row 2, left to right – Robert L. Crippen, Jay F. Honeycutt and Roy D. Bridges. Row 3, left to right – James W. Kennedy, William W. Parsons and Robert D. Cabana, KSC’s Center Director since 2008. Poster designed by Kennedy Space Center Graphics Department/Greg Lee. Credit: NASA

S | M | L | Details