skip to main content Access Keys List

Access Keys Definition

Remember to use the 'Alt' key in combination with the access key in Windows and the 'Ctrl' key in combination with the access key in Mac

Windows requires that the 'Enter' key be pressed after the access key is activated.

Select a bookmarking site.

Or copy the link below

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/
kennedy/home/index.html

Media Gallery Results - 1 - 20 of 213 returned

Category: Deep Impact To refine search, enter text here

Stream Video KSC-05-S-00036
KSC-05-S-00036 (02/03/2005) --- With a reputation for ingenious creativity and clever innovation, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California is a center known for its daring robotic missions to Mars and beyond. JPL's prosperous history dates back to the 1930s. The foundation for the laboratory was laid in the city of Pasadena by the California Institute of Technology. A curious group of university researchers was interested in experimenting with rocket engines. The risk of explosions caused campus leaders to send the group a few miles away, to the Arroyo Seco wash at the foot of the San Gabriel mountains. Read more...

Stream: Stream to Real Player  | Details
Stream Video KSC-05-S-00027
KSC-05-S-00027 (01/14/2005) --- Dr. Lucy McFadden, professor of astronomy at University of Maryland, joins NASA Direct's Deep Impact webcast. Dr. McFadden discusses the science and technology behind Deep Impact and answers viewers' questions about this ambitious mission. Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3-by-3-foot projectile called an "impactor" to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact's flyby spacecraft will collect pictures and data of the resulting crater. Scientists suspect that frozen within comets are the same chemical building blocks that lead to the formation of water -- and life -- here on Earth.

Stream: Stream to Real Player  | Details
Stream Video KSC-05-S-00026
KSC-05-S-00026 (01/14/2005) --- During NASA Direct's Deep Impact webcast, NASA Launch Manager Omar Baez explains launch processing and key events to look for during the countdown. Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3-by-3-foot projectile called an "impactor" to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact's flyby spacecraft will collect pictures and data of the resulting crater. Scientists suspect that frozen within comets are the same chemical building blocks that lead to the formation of water -- and life -- here on Earth.

Stream: Stream to Real Player  | Details
Stream Video KSC-05-S-00025
KSC-05-S-00025 (01/14/2005) --- Delta Weather Officer Joel Tumbiolo gives a briefing on the launch weather forecast for NASA Direct's Deep Impact webcast. The mission will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3-by-3-foot projectile called an "impactor" to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact's flyby spacecraft will collect pictures and data of the resulting crater. Scientists suspect that frozen within comets are the same chemical building blocks that lead to the formation of water -- and life -- here on Earth.

Stream: Stream to Real Player  | Details
Stream Video KSC-05-S-00024
KSC-05-S-00024 (01/14/2005) --- During NASA Direct's Deep Impact webcast, Mission Integration Manager Mike Stelzer and JPL Launch Vehicle Integration Manager Tom Shaw explain how the launch vehicle and spacecraft were joined, or "integrated." Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3-by-3-foot projectile called an "impactor" to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact's flyby spacecraft will collect pictures and data of the resulting crater. Scientists suspect that frozen within comets are the same chemical building blocks that lead to the formation of water -- and life -- here on Earth.

Stream: Stream to Real Player  | Details
Stream Video KSC-05-S-00023
KSC-05-S-00023 (01/14/2005) --- What can a comet tell us about our origin? The Deep Impact mission was designed to help answer this question. In an introduction to NASA Direct's Deep Impact webcast, Kennedy Space Center Director James Kennedy explains how the spacecraft will collide with Comet Tempel 1 to search for clues to the formation of our Solar System. Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3-by-3-foot projectile called an "impactor" to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact's flyby spacecraft will collect pictures and data of the resulting crater. Read more...

Stream: Stream to Real Player  | Details
Open Image KSC-05PP-0138
KSC-05PP-0138 (01/12/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Emerging through the smoke and steam, the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft lifts off at 1:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact is heading for space and a rendezvous 83 million miles from Earth with Comet Tempel 1. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-05PD-0137
KSC-05PD-0137 (01/12/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After a perfect liftoff at 1:47 p.m. EST today from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., the Boeing Delta II rocket with Deep Impact spacecraft aboard soars through the clear blue sky. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact is heading for space and a rendezvous 83 million miles from Earth with Comet Tempel 1. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-05PD-0136
KSC-05PD-0136 (01/12/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Engulfed by flames and smoke, NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft lifts off at 1:47 p.m. EST today from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact is heading for space and a rendezvous 83 million miles from Earth with Comet Tempel 1. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-05PD-0135
KSC-05PD-0135 (01/12/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Erupting from the flames and smoke beneath it, NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft lifts off at 1:47 p.m. EST today from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact is heading for space and a rendezvous 83 million miles from Earth with Comet Tempel 1. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-05PD-0134
KSC-05PD-0134 (01/12/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Erupting from the flames and smoke beneath it, NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft lifts off at 1:47 p.m. EST today from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact is heading for space and a rendezvous 83 million miles from Earth with Comet Tempel 1. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-05PD-0133
KSC-05PD-0133 (01/12/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From the nearby Press Site at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., photographers capture the exciting launch of the Deep Impact spacecraft at 1:47 p.m. EST. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact is heading for space and a rendezvous 83 million miles from Earth with Comet Tempel 1. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-05PD-0132
KSC-05PD-0132 (01/12/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Guests of NASA gather near the launch site at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., to watch the Deep Impact spacecraft as it speeds through the air after a perfect launch at 1:47 p.m. EST. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact is heading for space and a rendezvous 83 million miles from Earth with Comet Tempel 1. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-05PD-0131
KSC-05PD-0131 (01/12/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Erupting from the flames and smoke beneath it, NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft lifts off at 1:47 p.m. EST today from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact is heading for space and a rendezvous 83 million miles from Earth with Comet Tempel 1. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-05PD-0130
KSC-05PD-0130 (01/12/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - With a burst of flames, NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft lifts off at 1:47 p.m. EST today from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact is heading for space and a rendezvous 83 million miles from Earth with Comet Tempel 1. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-05PD-0129
KSC-05PD-0129 (01/12/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The sun rises behind Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., where the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying the Deep Impact spacecraft waits for launch. Gray clouds above the horizon belie the favorable weather forecast for the afternoon launch. Scheduled for liftoff at 1:47 p.m. EST today, Deep Impact will head for space and a rendezvous with Comet Tempel 1 when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-05PD-0128
KSC-05PD-0128 (01/12/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying the Deep Impact spacecraft stands out against an early dawn sky. Scheduled for liftoff at 1:47 p.m. EST today, Deep Impact will head for space and a rendezvous with Comet Tempel 1 when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-05PD-0127
KSC-05PD-0127 (01/12/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., the Boeing Delta II carrying the Deep Impact spacecraft rocket shines under spotlights in the early dawn hours as it waits for launch. Scheduled for liftoff at 1:47 p.m. EST today, Deep Impact will head for space and a rendezvous with Comet Tempel 1 when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-05PD-0126
KSC-05PD-0126 (01/12/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., shadows paint the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying the Deep Impact spacecraft as the mobile service tower at left is rolled back before launch.Scheduled for liftoff at 1:47 p.m. EST today, Deep Impact will head for space and a rendezvous with Comet Tempel 1 when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Read more...

S | M | L | Details
Open Image KSC-05PD-0125
KSC-05PD-0125 (01/12/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying the Deep Impact spacecraft looms into the night sky as the mobile service tower at right is rolled back before launch. Scheduled for liftoff at 1:47 p.m. EST today, Deep Impact will head for space and a rendezvous with Comet Tempel 1 when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Read more...

S | M | L | Details