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Media Gallery Results - 1 - 20 of 177 returned

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Open Image KSC-05PD-2199
KSC-05PD-2199 (09/15/2005) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Orbiter Processing Facility, bay 3, Pat Cerny, with United Space Alliance, monitors readings from thermography testing on Discovery’s nose cone. Thermography uses high-intensity light to heat specific areas, which are then immediately scanned with an infrared camera. As the area cools, internal flaws are revealed. Discovery has been identified as the orbiter to fly on mission STS-121.

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Stream Video KSC-05-S-00030
KSC-05-S-00030 (01/25/2005) --- After blasting off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, in November 2004, NASA's Swift spacecraft wasted no time in getting down to the business of spotting gamma-ray bursts. Just after opening its doors in December, Swift detected a flurry of bursts. Scientists were still calibrating the main instrument -- the Burst Alert Telescope -- when the first burst appeared on Dec. 17. They witnessed four more over the following few days, leading scientists to wonder if they previously underestimated the true rate at which these powerful events occur. Read more...

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Stream Video KSC-04-S-00404
KSC-04-S-00404 (12/22/2004) --- On January 4, 2004, the Mars exploration rover named Spirit touched down on the red planet, 106 million miles from Earth. The first of two rovers to arrive on Mars, Spirit began its mission searching for signs of a watery history. The rover was designed to function for 91 days. However, thanks to outstanding engineering, Spirit has been roaming Mars for more than 300 days! After its first tentative treks from the landing platform, the rover quickly grew comfortable navigating the rocky terrain. Read more...

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Stream Video KSC-04-S-00386
KSC-04-S-00386 (11/30/2004) --- Host Rex Engelhardt, Swift Mission Integration Manager introduces Dr. Neil Gehrels, Swift Principal Investigator at Goddard Space Flight Center. Gehrels describes the objectives of the Swift mission. A question and answer period follows. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands.

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Stream Video KSC-04-S-00385
KSC-04-S-00385 (11/30/2004) --- Host Rex Engelhardt, Swift Mission Integration Manager introduces John Nousek, Swift Mission Director at Penn State University's Mission Control Center. Nousek explains the responsibility of the Operations Control Center and goals for studying gamma-ray bursts. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands.

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Stream Video KSC-04-S-00384
KSC-04-S-00384 (11/30/2004) --- Host Rex Engelhardt, Swift Mission Integration Manager introduces Tim Gehringer, Swift Deputy Project Manager. Gehringer explains why the Swift spacecraft and its trio of specialized instruments is perfectly suited to the hunt for gamma-ray bursts. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands.

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Stream Video KSC-04-S-00383
KSC-04-S-00383 (11/30/2004) --- Swift Project Manager Joe Dezio welcomes viewers to this NASA Direct! Swift Science and Spacecraft Overview webcast from Kennedy Space Center. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands.

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Stream Video KSC-04-S-00382
KSC-04-S-00382 (11/29/2004) --- Host Tiffany Nail introduces Chuck Dovale, NASA Launch Director. Dovale describes the process for getting the Swift spacecraft ready for flight. A question and answer period follows. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands.

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Stream Video KSC-04-S-00381
KSC-04-S-00381 (11/29/2004) --- NASA Launch Manager, Omar Baez describes the Delta II rocket and the preparation process for launch. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands.

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Stream Video KSC-04-S-00380
KSC-04-S-00380 (11/29/2004) --- Host Tiffany Nail introduces Joel Tumbiolo, Air Force Weather Officer. Tumbiolo provides an update on the Swift launch day forecast and reviews the conditions required for a safe launch. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands.

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Stream Video KSC-04-S-00379
KSC-04-S-00379 (11/29/2004) --- James Kennedy, KSC Center Director, welcomes viewers to this NASA Direct! Swift Mission webcast direct from Kennedy Space Center. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands.

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Open Image KSC-04PD-2384
KSC-04PD-2384 (11/20/2004) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Boeing Delta II launch vehicle for NASA’s Swift spacecraft is poised for launch at the scheduled liftoff time of 12:16:00.611 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 17-A on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands. [Photo courtesy of Scott Andrews]

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Open Image KSC-04PD-2383
KSC-04PD-2383 (11/20/2004) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Boeing Delta II launch vehicle for NASA’s Swift spacecraft is silhouetted against a rosy sky at sunrise, waiting for liftoff scheduled for 12:16:00.611 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 17-A on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands. [Photo courtesy of Scott Andrews]

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Open Image KSC-04PD-2357
KSC-04PD-2357 (11/20/2004) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The engines of a Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle ignite to blast NASA’s Swift spacecraft on its way from Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, at 12:16:00.611 p.m. EST Nov. 20 . Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands. [Photo courtesy of Scott Andrews]

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Open Image KSC-04PD-2356
KSC-04PD-2356 (11/20/2004) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Clouds of exhaust form around a Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle as it blasts NASA’s Swift spacecraft on its mission from Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, at 12:16:00.611 p.m. EST Nov. 20 . Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands. [Photo courtesy of Scott Andrews]

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Open Image KSC-04PD-2355
KSC-04PD-2355 (11/20/2004) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Solid Rocket Boosters of the Boeing Delta II rocket, used to launch NASA’s Swift spacecraft, fall toward the Atlantic Ocean as the rocket continues on its path down range. The successful launch took place at Complex 17A at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Nov. 20 at 12:16:00.611 p.m. EST. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands.

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Open Image KSC-04PD-2354
KSC-04PD-2354 (11/20/2004) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA's Swift spacecraft blasts off from Complex 17A into the beautiful blue sky above Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Nov. 20 at 12:16:00.611 p.m. EST aboard a Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands.

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Open Image KSC-04PD-2353
KSC-04PD-2353 (11/20/2004) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Clouds of exhaust form around a Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle as it blasts NASA's Swift spacecraft on its mission at Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, on Nov. 20 at 12:16:00.611 p.m. EST. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands.

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Open Image KSC-04PD-2352
KSC-04PD-2352 (11/20/2004) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The engines of a Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle ignite to blast NASA's Swift spacecraft on its way at Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, on Nov. 20 at 12:16:00.611 p.m. EST. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands.

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Open Image KSC-04PD-2351
KSC-04PD-2351 (11/20/2004) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The engines of a Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle ignite to blast NASA's Swift spacecraft on its way at Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, on Nov. 20 at 12:16:00.611 p.m. EST. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands.

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