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Media Detail

National Aeronautics and Space Administration
John F. Kennedy Space Center
Kennedy Space Center, Florida 32899
FOR RELEASE: 07/08/2011
PHOTO NO: KSC-2011-5326
Open Image KSC-2011-5326

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No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.

PHOTO CREDIT:   CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- After 30 years and 135 missions, invited guests congregate along the NASA Causeway to see the rocket's red glare of NASA's Space Shuttle Program soar for the last time. Space shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to liftoff at 11:26 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. On board will be four experienced astronauts -- STS-135 Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Doug Hurley, and Mission Specialists Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim. STS-135 will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts for the International Space Station. Atlantis also will fly the Robotic Refueling Mission experiment that will investigate the potential for robotically refueling existing satellites in orbit. In addition, Atlantis will return with a failed ammonia pump module to help NASA better understand the failure mechanism and improve pump designs for future systems. STS-135 will be the 33rd flight of Atlantis, the 37th shuttle mission to the space station, and the 135th and final mission of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux

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